Dogwood is the state flower. Virginia Courthouses

 

Prince William County courthouse is in Manassas, Virginia.

9311 Lee Avenue, Manassas, Virginia 20110

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Prince William County was named for William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland and third son of Gorge II.

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Various locations for the courthouse

Prince William County was carved from Stafford and King George counties in 1730. The first courthouse was built in 1731 on the banks of the Occoquan River at Woodbridge.

Haymarket was the site of the Prince William County district court for a period. It served Fairfax, Loudoun, Fauquier, and Prince William counties. Today the building is Saint Paul's Episcopal church from 1834.

In 1732 the courthouse was at Brent Town (Brentsville). It moved to return some years later as the foruth courthouse, in 1820. The Brentsville courthouse is a two-story Federal styled building. It was built by William Claytor of Range County in the temple form. Foundation is locally quarried red sandstone.

During the Civil War Yankee soldiers borrowed the bricks. A soldier wrote, "With the Court-house, they commenced at the top to get bricks, beginning with the chimneys and working down, while with the cler's office, they commenced at the bottom and worked up."

The city of Manassas originated in 1852 at the junction of Manassas Gap and Orange and Alexandria railroads. During the Civil War this strategic junction’s lead to two important battles.

After the wars the community grew, citizens sought to move the county seat there from Brentsville. In 1872 and in 1888 referrunda failed. A third referrundum in 1892 succeeded.

This Romanesque Revival courthouse, designed by Thomas C. Teague and Philip T. Barye from Norfolk and Newport News was completed 1893 and served the county until 1984 when a new courthouse was built nearby.

 
 

Additional Pictures:

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  Current Prince William County Courthouse  

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  Fifth Prince William County Courthouse

The city of Manassas originated in 1852 at the junction of the Manassas Gap and the Orange & alexandria railroads. During the Civil War the junction's strategic significance led to two important battles nearby. After the war, as the community grew, citizens sought to move the county seat there from Brentsville. In 1872, a year before Manassas was incorporated as a town and again in 1888, refernda failed. A third referendum in 1892 succeeded. This Romanesque Revival courthouse, designed by James C. Teaque and Philip T. Marye, of Norfold and Newport News, was completed in 1893 and served the county until 1984 when a new courthouse was built nearby.

 

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Peace Marker

In July 1911, an amazing event took place here at Manassas, Virginia. The Manassas National Jubilee of Peace brought together Union and Confederate veterans fifty years after the first major battle of the Civil War. For the first time, veterans of both sides came together on the same ground in a ceremony of peace and reconciliation.

The idea for the Peace Jubilee, a week-long celebration of national healing and reunion that took place July 16-22, came in a letter to the Washington Post from D.H. Russell, a South Carolina Confederate veteran. He suggested that the fiftieth anniversary of the First Battle of Manassas be one of peace and reconciliation. George Carr Round, a respected community leader and Union veteran who had settled here after the war, read his words and decided to act on them.

The festivities culminated on July 21, the battle's anniversary. The Union and Confederate veterans fell into opposing lines on Henry House Hill, where fifty years before they had clashed in mortal combat. On a signal, the two sides approached each other,, and as they met they clasped hands in friendship and reconciliation. After a picnic on the battlefield, the crowd returned to the Prince William County Courthouse to listen to a speech by President William Howard Taft.

Civil War veterans later held reunions on other great Civil War battlefields, but just as Manassas had been the site of the first major engagement of the war, it was also the site of the first reunion of these former adversaries.

 

Historic Marker in Prince William

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In Commenoration of the Manassas National Jubilee of Peace

The first instance in history where survivors of a great battle met fifty years after and exchanged friendly greetings at the place of actual combat.
Here on July 21st, 1911, the closing scene was enacted.
The Tableau of the Re-United States.
The President, the Governor of Virginia and forty-eight maidens in white took part with 1000 veterans of the Blue and the Gray and 10,000 citizens of The New America.

 
       

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  Complete picture showing the Peace Memorial.  
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Links of Interest:

City of Manassas Official Website

Prince William County official website

Clerk of the Court

General District (31st)

Chamber of Commerce

RootsWeb

Additional Information

Photos of Old Courthouse

 
         
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